Internet of Things The future of transport is here. Are you ready?

Photo: Max Talbot-Minkin/Flickr

Technology is transforming transport with a speed and scale that are hard to comprehend. The transport systems of tomorrow will be connected, data-driven, shared, on-demand, electric, and highly automated. Ideas are moving swiftly from conception, research and design, testbed to early adoption, and, finally, mass acceptance. And according to projections, the pace of innovation is only going to accelerate.

Autonomous cars are expected to comprise about 25% of the global market by 2040. Flying taxis are already tested in Dubai. Cargo drones will become more economical than motorcycle delivery by 2020. Three Hyperloop systems are expected by 2021. Maglev trains are already operating in Japan, South Korea, and China, and being constructed or planned in Europe, Asia, Australia, and the USA. Blockchain technology has already been used to streamline the procedures for shipping exports, reducing the processing and handling times for key documents, increasing efficiency and reliability,

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  • Tags:
  • intelligent transport systems
  • IoT
  • Internet of Things
  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Machine learning
  • automation
  • car sharing
  • Sharing Economy
  • digital development
  • su

Why technology will disrupt and transform Africa’s agriculture sector—in a good way

© Dasan Bobo/World Bank
© Dasan Bobo/World Bank

Agriculture is critical to some of Africa’s biggest development goals. The sector is an engine of job creation: Farming alone currently accounts for about 60 percent of total employment in sub-Saharan Africa, while the share of jobs across the food system is potentially much larger. In Ethiopia, Malawi, Mozambique, Tanzania, Uganda, and Zambia, the food system is projected to add more jobs than the rest of the economy between 2010 and 2025. Agriculture is also a driver of inclusive and sustainable growth, and the foundation of a food system that provides nutritious, safe, and affordable food. 

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  • Ethiopia
  • Malawi
  • Mozambique
  • Tanzania
  • Uganda
  • Zambia
  • Kenya
  • Nigeria
  • Africa
  • Agriculture and Rural Development
  • Information and Communication Technologies
  • technology
  • farming
  • Internet of Things
  • IoT
  • digital development
  • blockchain

Your Cow, Plant, Fridge and Elevator Can Talk to You (But Your Kids Still Won’t!)

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The Internet of Things (IoT) heralds a new world in which everything (well, almost everything) can now talk to you, through a combination of sensors and analytics. Cows can tell you when they’d like to be milked or when they’re sick, plants can tell you about their soil conditions and light frequency, your fridge can tell you when your food is going bad (and order you a new carton of milk), and your elevator can tell you how well it’s functioning.

At the World Bank, we’re looking at all these things (Things?) from a development angle. That’s the basis behind the new report, “Internet of Things: The New Government to Business Platform”, which focuses on how the Internet of Things can help governments deliver services better. The report looks at the ways that some cities have begun using IoT, and considers how governments can harness its benefits while minimizing potential risks and problems.

In short, it’s still the Wild West in terms of IoT and governments. The report found lots of IoT-related initiatives (lamppost sensors for measuring pollution, real-time transit updates through GPS devices, sensors for measuring volumes in garbage bins), but almost no scaled applications. Part of the story has to do with data – governments are still struggling how to collect and manage the vast quantities of data associated with IoT, and issues of data access and valuation also pose problems.

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  • Tags:
  • The World Region
  • Information and Communication Technologies
  • Private Sector Development
  • Sustainable Communities
  • Internet of Things

Zero docks: what we learnt about dockless bike-sharing during #TTDC2018

Dockless bikes typically sport bright colors that make them easy to identify.
Photo: Montgomery County/Flickr

How can we harness the digital economy to make mobility more sustainable? This question was the main focus of this year’s Transforming Transportation conference, which brought together some of most creative and innovative thinkers in the world of mobility. One of them was Davis Wang, CEO of Mobike, a Chinese startup that pioneered the development of dockless bike-sharing and is now present in more than 200 cities across 12 countries. In his remarks, Wang raised a number of interesting points and inspired me to continue the conversation on the future of dockless bike-share systems and their potential as a new form of urban transport.

What exactly is dockless bike-sharing (DBS)?

Introduced in Beijing just under two years ago, dockless bike-share has been spreading rapidly across the world, with Mobike and three other companies entering the Washington, D.C. market in September 2017.

As their name indicates, the main feature that distinguishes “dockless” or “free-floating” systems from traditional bike-share is that riders can pick up and drop off the bicycles anywhere on the street rather than at a fixed station.

This is made possible by a small connected device fitted on each bike that allows users to locate and unlock the nearest bike with their smartphone in a matter of seconds—yet another new derivative of the “internet of things” revolution!

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  • Tags:
  • Internet of Things
  • digital economy
  • smartphones
  • bicycles
  • cycling
  • smart mobility
  • shared mobility
  • urban mobility
  • urban transport
  • sustainable cities
  • sustainable mobility
  • Sustainable Communities
  • Information and Communication Technologies
  • Health
  • Climate Change
  • Urban Development
  • Transport
  • East Asia and Pacific
  • United States
  • China